Hellhound



Hellhound is the dog of hell, found in mythology, folklore and fiction. Hellhound usually have features such as having a very large size, black hair, red eyes glow, or the power of super-fast, pale or phantom characteristics, and sometimes even the ability to speak. Hellhounds are often associated with fire, and there may be fire based on ability and circumstances. They are usually assigned to guard the entrance to the realm of the dead or perform other tasks associated with the afterlife or the supernatural, such as hunting down lost souls or maintain the unseen treasures. As legends go, if you see hellhound three times, you will suddenly died.

Hellhound story of the most famous is probably the Cerberus, the dog from hell from Greek mythology. Hellhounds are also famous in Celtic mythology as part of the Wild Hunt. Hounds are given a few local names in folklore, but displays characteristic Hellhound. Common myths in English, and many names given to the apparitions: Black Shuck of East Anglia (which has its roots in Norse mythology than that of the Celt), Moddey Dhoo from Isle of Man, Wales, Gwyllgi, and so on. See Barghest. The earliest mention of this is a myth in the second Walter Map’s De Nugis Curialium (1190) and Wales myth cycle of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi (ca. 10-13 century)

In southern Mexico and Central American folklore, which Cadejo (or Cadejos in Costa Rica) is a large black dog chasing boys naughty young that came out late at night on rural roads. The term is also prevalent in American blues music, such as Robert Johnson’s “Hellhound on my Trail”.

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